Date and Time

Creating and Displaying Dates

The Date class provides a simplified way to work with date and time in Lua; it leans heavily on the functions os.date and os.time.

A Date object can be constructed from a table, just like with os.time. Methods are provided to get and set the various parts of the date.

> d = Date {year = 2011, month = 3, day = 2 }
> = d
2011-03-02 12:00:00
> = d:month(),d:year(),d:day()
3    2011    2
> d:month(4)
> = d
2011-04-02 12:00:00
> d:add {day=1}
> = d
2011-04-03 12:00:00

add takes a table containing one of the date table fields.

> = d:weekday_name()
Sun
> = d:last_day()
2011-04-30 12:00:00
> = d:month_name(true)
April

There is a default conversion to text for date objects, but Date.Format gives you full control of the format for both parsing and displaying dates:

> iso = Date.Format 'yyyy-mm-dd'
> d = iso:parse '2010-04-10'
> amer = Date.Format 'mm/dd/yyyy'
> = amer:tostring(d)
04/10/2010

With the 0.9.7 relase, the Date constructor has become more flexible. You may omit any of the ‘year’, ‘month’ or ‘day’ fields:

> = Date { year = 2008 }
2008-01-01 12:00:00
> = Date { month = 3 }
2011-03-01 12:00:00
> = Date { day = 20 }
2011-10-20 12:00:00
> = Date { hour = 14, min = 30 }
2011-10-13 14:30:00

If ‘year’ is omitted, then the current year is assumed, and likewise for ‘month’.

To set the time on such a partial date, you can use the fact that the ‘setter’ methods return the date object and so you can ‘chain’ these methods.

> d = Date { day = 03 }
> = d:hour(18):min(30)
2011-10-03 18:30:00

Finally, Date also now accepts positional arguments:

> = Date(2011,10,3)
2011-10-03 12:00:00
> = Date(2011,10,3,18,30,23)
2011-10-03 18:30:23

Date.format has been extended. If you construct an instance without a pattern, then it will try to match against a set of known formats. This is useful for human-input dates since keeping to a strict format is not one of the strong points of users. It assumes that there will be a date, and then a date.

> df = Date.Format()
> = df:parse '5.30pm'
2011-10-13 17:30:00
> = df:parse '1730'
nil     day out of range: 1730 is not between 1 and 31
> = df:parse '17.30'
2011-10-13 17:30:00
> = df:parse 'mar'
2011-03-01 12:00:00
> = df:parse '3 March'
2011-03-03 12:00:00
> = df:parse '15 March'
2011-03-15 12:00:00
> = df:parse '15 March 2008'
2008-03-15 12:00:00
> = df:parse '15 March 2008 1.30pm'
2008-03-15 13:30:00
> = df:parse '2008-10-03 15:30:23'
2008-10-03 15:30:23

ISO date format is of course a good idea if you need to deal with users from different countries. Here is the default behaviour for ‘short’ dates:

> = df:parse '24/02/12'
2012-02-24 12:00:00

That’s not what Americans expect! It’s tricky to work out in a cross-platform way exactly what the expected format is, so there is an explicit flag:

> df:US_order(true)
> = df:parse '9/11/01'
2001-11-09 12:00:00
generated by LDoc 1.4.4 Last updated 2016-08-14 19:25:18